3D TOOLS dot INFO http://3dtools.info webshop for 3d artists Mon, 03 Jul 2017 12:40:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Alberto Cibinetto, Baumatte – Italy http://3dtools.info/baumatte/ http://3dtools.info/baumatte/#comments Mon, 12 Jun 2017 11:45:02 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=7519

This week The Render Guy meets Alberto Cibinetto of Baumatte

an architectural visualization studio based in Italy he also runs Bauclassroom, an architectural visualization school.

Being myself also a Cinema 4d and Vray user I was very interested in having a small conversation with him that I could share with you guys.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

01

1. HI ALBERTO, THANKS FOR TAKING THE TIME; TELL US PLEASE WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT YOU DO.

Hi TRG, i’m an Italian architect and cg artist.
My interest in cg and, specifically, in architectural visualization started about ten years ago during university and then become my work.
I’m founder of Baumatte, an architectural visualization studio based in Treviso, Italy. We provide images for architects, designers, real estate and more.
In 2014 i founded Bauclassroom, an architectural visualization school for architects or students who want to learn in deep to achieve high-end images.

11

2. HOW DID YOU GET IN THE FIELD OF ARCHVIZ?

During my degree studies my father teach me something about photography and photo processing in darkroom. That world fascinated me so much so i started working on postprocessing images: both personal photos and first rudimentary render images.
These were very important years for me, i learn a lot and start to find ispiration everywhere: from photography, films, art and a lot of cg artists.

10

3.THE WORK OF YOUR STUDENTS LOOKS AMAZING. CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE BIT MORE ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL, HOW IT WORKS?

Well, we are a very passionate team and i think this is a good starting point. During our Workshop we spent lot of hours with our students and is important to work in a great mood and with positive spirit. I think this is the only way to obtain highest results.
Since 2014 we have about two-hundred students and during these years we improved our classes and now we provide different kind of workshop: postproduction ws, visualization ws focused on exterior and interior.
Our goal is to train people step by step into architectural visualization with different knowledges from photography and art to technical modeling and texturing. An important aspect for us is to have a “cultural” approach to images and to create renderings.
Camera angle, lighting, material creation and postproduction process have same importance and great use of them with good perception for composition and colors produce emotional images.

09

4. WHAT ABOUT YOUR WORK, HOW DO YOU APPROACH IT, WHAT DO YOU TRY TO ACHIEVE, WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT IT AND WHEN DO YOUR CONSIDER A PROJECT READY?

This is great questions because our images are made for different purposes. Sometimes for clients and sometimes for our workshop. Last one often is the most difficult goal.
Start from clients: first step is to understand or TRY to understand what they are looking for. This is the most important phase, in our opinion, because is the starting point of our workflow.
We ask for drawings, sketches, material references and any suggestion in order to understand mood and details about images we are going to work on.
After we start modeling from 2d or 3d files and in second case sometimes we prefer to re-model all with our specifics in order to obtain great mesh and surface.
After this we start lighting phase, for us very important and we send some sketches to the client that choose the one closest to his idea. Then we move to material creation and adding details.
We use high quality texture or scan texture in order to obtain better results; sometimes main texture come out after hours of photoshop adjustments.
Now it’s time to send a low quality preview to clients and when confirmed we move to computing high-quality render. Normally 4/5k width.
Postproduction phase could be quite fast, for example in interior or massive in case of exterior images with less 3d details, in case of competition and short deadline.
Personally i love postproduction, i think that is the most flexible and artistic work in our production and sometimes could litteraly save you when you are running in short deadline.
For workshop images the process is the same, more or less. There isn’t a “real” client but we are at same time cg artist and client of ourselves.

08

5. YOU ARE OBVIOUSLY A VRAYFORC4D USER, WHAT PUSHED YOU TOWARDS THIS SOFTWARE?

I’m a “in-love” cinema 4d user since a was a student.

During my Architecture degree i was a mac user so i start doing my 3d model with Archicad and Cinema 4d. I think i’ve tried one of the first version of Vrayforc4d, it was 1.04 (if i remember correct).

Since then V-Ray has grown incredibly and now with last version 3.4 it is very powerful, flexible and stable (very important aspect during images production).

SurfaceSpread (Laubwerk) is also an important plugin since we now make almost everyhting in 3d and need a powerful scattering tool. It allow us to manage tons of clones in our scene. I’m also a tester of SurfaceSpread and i would thank Timm Dapper for the development and support.

07

6. YOU NOW WORK WITH VERSION 3.4 CAN YOU TELL US A BIT MORE ABOUT THIS UPGRADE?

I’m using it since few months and i’m very happy about improvements.
Progressive anti-aliasing works perfect and speed increase is great.
I like also the VFB with lot of controls that allows to have quick post in real time during rendering.

06

7. CAN YOU TELL US ONE OF THE FUNNIEST THINGS THAT HAPPENED DURING YOUR CAREER AS A 3D ARTIST?

During these years we worked with different clients and different kind of projects; so we found completely different situations. Both funny and embarrassing.
A while a go, a client asked us if our Workshops had a cost or if we make them for free…we answered that we believe in charity and each of us is free to do it as it wants..but we don’t do it with clients…;-)

05

8. HOW DO YOU THINK THE INDUSTRY WILL CHANGE IN THE NEAR FUTURE?

Cg Industry is growing quickly. VR is here and in coming months i think that lot of companies wi’ll invest time and money in this amazing tecnology.
However, despite of most common thiking that Softwares do images, no futuristic technology or hardware could replace people.
Behind images, movies, vfx there are always people.
There is no “better” software…each one is great if you are good at using it.
You can learn all the thecnical aspects and plugins but if you miss image composition, importance of light and color tone, you’ll never be able to do great images.

04

9. IF YOU WERE TO MENTOR SOMEONE ABOUT THIS CAREER, WHAT WOULD YOU SUGGEST OR RECOMMEND? OR IF YOU COULD GO BACK IN TIME TO 10 YEARS AGO, WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO YOUR YOUNGER SELF?

During this years i found lot of inspiration from art, cinema, photography and more. If i could say something to a young cg artist who moves first steps in this industry is: be positive and curious..! Never stop learning from anybody. If you have great passion and perseverance you will get what you want.

03

10.THANKS A LOT FOR DOING THIS FOR US, IF PEOPLE WANTED TO CONTACT YOU WHERE THEY FIND YOU?

It was a pleasure, thank you guys.
My websites are:

www.baumatte.com
www.bauclassroom.com

Obviously we have facebook pages:

https://www.facebook.com/baumatte/?ref=bookmarks

https://www.facebook.com/bauclassroom/

02
]]>
http://3dtools.info/baumatte/feed/ 0
Yunal Zobu Varna, Bulgaria http://3dtools.info/yunal-zobu-bulgaria/ http://3dtools.info/yunal-zobu-bulgaria/#comments Tue, 14 Feb 2017 10:01:03 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=7195 This week The Render Guy meets Yunal Zobu from Varna, Bulgaria a generalist artist which work has been widely published on different forums. I met Yunal in Sofia for the CG2 event of Chaos group. He is an advanced VRAYforC4D user.

I hope you enjoy this interview  as much as I did.

 

1. Hi Yunal, thanks for taking the time; tell us please who you are and what you do.

Hi TRG, let me start by thanking you for this opportunity.
My Name is Yunal Zobu and together with Pavel Dimov we are running the CGI dept. of MOS Consult.  We are based in Varna, Bulgaria and we produce imagery not only for the arch-viz market but we are also steadily involved with projects for various furniture and kitchen manufacturers.

SB_cam_002

2. How did you get in the field of Visualization? And why specifically the branch you are in?

My initial entry into the world of 3D was – as some may describe it – a pure coincidence. I was looking for a job and this company was offering an internship at that moment, so I thought why not try something completely new. I started with C4D R10 and I’m totally hooked ever since.

Swing

3.Can you tell us a bit more about your work, how do you approach it, what do you try to achieve, what do you like about it and when do you consider a project ready?

We are mainly architectural visualization studio with a strong affinity towards animations and VR content.
Regardless the type of the project I always strive to achieve two goals: to meet our clients vision for a final product and to create something beautiful that I can be proud of during that process.
We consider our job done when our clients are happy with the end result. It always helps if we are happy at that stage with it as well :)

frame0060

4. Who is your biggest influence when it comes to finding inspiration?

I have to separate the types of influences into two. On one side you have the creative inspirations from the CG industry, the biggest one for me being Marek Denko followed by Athanasios “Noseman” Pozantzis and Mike “the Monkey” Senften. Recently I find myself really enjoying Simon Holmedal’s work as well. From the traditional drawing point of view Glen Keane is unmatched for me. His legendary Disney work aside, his latest two shorts “Paperman” and “Duet” will leave a mark in everyone who sees them.

The other (“dark”) side of it is the business side. For that part I can say that I really enjoy the grow and business model of Aixponza and try to listen to Manuel every time he’s talking about how they run the studio.

frame0011

5. You are obviously a VRAYforC4D user, what pushed you towards this software?

Since we started we strive to provide the best “product” possible.  That of course requests using the best tools out there and for us V-Ray has always been the go-to render engine. Through the years we continued to test different solutions and we are still staying open-minded towards any new developments (we are happily surprised with Redshift recently), simply V-Ray meets our needs better than any other render engine we have used so far.

cam_0003_flat_mini

6. You now work with Version 3.4 can you tell us a bit more about this upgrade?

Version 3.4 was a so long waited development for the whole C4D community and I can honestly state – it was hands down worth the wait!
The workflow is so simplified which makes such a huge difference on your daily work routine.

The additional features that we have now (progressive rendering, denoising, the GGX model, animated clippers, lens effects, GPU support, etc.) are really state of the art as far as rendering technology goes. And we got an additional plus, seeing VRayforC4D as part of the whole V-Ray family which is simply great.

cam_0001_flat_mini

7. Can you tell us one of the funniest things that happened during your career as a 3d artist?

I don’t know if it does classify as a “funny” moment per say, but it definitely left a very precious mark on me. For my first build board image I had to create a simple led stripe behind a glass shelf. It of course wasn’t that simple for me, keep in mind that I was very (un)fortunate to lend on such a project for say… my 5th rendering ever created.

Naturally I turned to the forums for help and a very respected member told me and I’m paraphrasing here “Boy, learn to walk before you run!”. Meaning my entire scene was a so crappy that my led lights were the last thing to worry about. All I can say is: Great advice, STRAT. Thank you!

BMW_ABB_Carpaint_Robots_HQ.mp4_snapshot_00.20_[2017.02.04_12.31.56]

 

8. How do you think the industry will change in the near future?

The biggest change that I expect is the waiting for rendering to be completely removed. The industry is already making the steps towards a complete real time rendering solution and if the hardware industry keeps the same development pace I think in 5-6 years we can surely expect the IPR windows to become the final renders in a few milliseconds.

006_shot02-cam01

9. If you were to mentor someone about this career, what would you suggest or recommend? Or if you could back in time to 10 years ago, what would you say to your younger self?

The one thing I’d say is to try to kill their ego as fast as possible. There are no secret shortcuts, no hidden features no matter of the software you choose. You simply have to work hard, put the extra hours every day, read a lot and be willing to invest in your own growth.

behance_004_black_and_white

10.Now on the geek side, what is you do to give your image that final magic touch?

I guess I won’t share anything new here. My latest post-production affection is Resolve. I can’t believe how good (and free) this piece of software is and yet how unpopular it still is.

11. Thanks a lot for doing this for us, if people wanted to contact you where can they find you?

Thanks for having me! You can find our portfolio at www.3DRender.tips and on my social media handles IG: yunal_zobu and TW: @YunalSobu

 

To learn more about Vrayforc4d get our Masterclass online and start learning now!

masterclass

 

]]>
http://3dtools.info/yunal-zobu-bulgaria/feed/ 0
Phil Buerer Guachinarte, Switzerland http://3dtools.info/phil-buerer/ http://3dtools.info/phil-buerer/#comments Tue, 07 Feb 2017 12:15:10 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=7159 This week The Render Guy meets Phil Buerer from Guachinarte, Switzerland a fantastic artist which work has been widely published on different forums. He is an advanced VRAYforC4D user.

I hope you enjoy this interview  as much as I did.

 

1. Hi Phil, thanks for taking the time; tell us please who you are and what you do.

Hi, I’m Phil. I am a freelance digital artist based in Switzerland, with a great passion for architectural visualization.

acantilado-house

2. how did you get in the field of Archviz?

It was a long process. I graduated as an architectural draftsman in the year 2002 and I started making my first visualizations even during my apprenticeship. At that time, it was more of a hobby and personal interest. From an early age, I was fascinated by the photo-collages and physical models, and growing up it used to be my dream to, one day, build my own models. After my apprenticeship, I’ve worked in different architecture studios with the ambition to create visualizations. But unfortunately, most projects didn’t foresee any visualizations at all. And in those projects, that had budgets for visualizations, they were usually for external graphic professionals. Since it was till my goal to create visualizations, much rather than plans, I decided to leave my job and enter the visualization field as a freelancer. But, lacking experience, or a good portfolio. My first own projects were mostly drawing plans, with an option to create a visualization. In 2008 I enrolled in a multimedia academy and visited courses for cinema 4d, along with other topics like graphic-design, web-design, photography and movies. During that time, I learned a lot. Because all those topics, in one way or another, play a role in architectural visualization. Today my work is mostly visualizations, but I still have to take on other jobs every now and then. So, in a way I’m still trying to get into the field.

casa-diego-rivera

3.Can you tell us a bit more about your work, how do you approach it, what do you try to achieve, what do you like about it and when do your consider a project ready?

The first thing is to get as much information as possible about the project. The blueprints, textual descriptions, concepts, information and pictures of the location etc. Then I feel it’s important to thoroughly interview the client. I often ask for some reference images/renderings to get an idea of what kind of aesthetics they like and what kind of quality they expect. With all that, I start to sketch and imagine the result for myself. I always aim to one up my last work, and exceed the expectations of the client. I want to impress my client, so they can then impress their clients, or the target audience of the visualization. I think the project is finished when looking at the result leaves me with a good feeling. Meaning there are no more details that feel out of place, or disturb the image in a way. The scene shouldn’t look bare nor overfilled with clutter, the colors should be right, the lighting look natural etc. The image just has to look “right”.

eames-house

4. Who is your biggest influence when it comes to finding inspiration?

Inspiration is just everywhere. In photography, film, music, traditional art, paintings, other 3d artists… I’m a big fan of Luis Barragán’s work, also Richard Neutra, or photographers like Julius Shulman, Ezra Stoller, or Slim Aarons to name just a few. Pinterest is a really good tool to get inspiration. The most inspiration I draw from traveling. Unfortunately, that is also the most expensive way, but it doesn’t have to always be far. Often it is just a matter of having a closer look at something that I previously overlooked. Maybe even in my own backyard.

hotel-room

5. You are obviously a VRAYforC4D user, what pushed you towards this software?

I remember it well. I was working on an interior scene that was very hard to illuminate, I just couldn’t get it right. At that time, I’ve worked with the cinema 4d built in renderer. Then an experienced cinema 4d user gave me the advice to make the ceiling invisible for the sunlight, to let the sunlight in directly, and then darken the ceiling with ambient occlusion. That “work around” seemed just wrong to me and frankly rather crazy. This was the moment when I decided that I’m in dire need of a good renderer. I’ve tried different render engines and in the end, not the least, because at that time my CPU was far more potent than my GPU, I settled with vray. A choice I never regretted.

stadtpark-biel

6. You now work with Version 3.4 can you tell us a bit more about this upgrade?

I’ve only just upgraded a week ago, thus I can’t give much feedback so far. The new version looks very promising. I have great expectations. I was very happy with the 1.9 version. What I understood so far is that 3.4 is easier to use and faster. So, what can I say? I’m happy.

miller-house1

7. Can you tell us one of the funniest things that happened during your career as a 3d artist?

One time, I was at a client’s office for the initial interview. I was talking to the owner of the company directly, and he seemed very busy. So it happened, that we didn’t really sit down for a normal meeting, but rather I was just following him around the office while we talked, when suddenly, without notice, and as if nothing weird were about to happen, he walked into the bathroom. And kept talking from in there :O!?

miller-house2

8. How do you think the industry will change in the near future?

What’s still very complicated today, will become easy to achieve tomorrow. But at the same time customer expectations will increase, naturally. So I guess the quality will always increase in general. Virtual reality has just started, even though I think it will take some time. In my opinion architecture will not be at the forefront of VR however. In the end, it’s always the tools that are changing, the tasks will remain the same. The same way roman architects built models with “sticks and stones” of their visions to share them with their sponsors or principals, we will create virtual reality tours from bases to be built on mars to convince investors. Bus as I mentioned above, I think it’s a looong way before the classic image will disappear.

paint-it-green

9. If you were to mentor someone about this career, what would you suggest or recommend? Or if you could back in time to 10 years ago, what would you say to your younger self?

You need a lot of patience, everything will take time. Patience and passion are maybe the most important abilities. As a visualizer, you are a designer, photographer, painter and a storyteller so it won’t hurt to learn this too. Always compare yourself with the best artists, but also look at their work critically. Ask why instead of how.

private-residence

10.Now on the geek side, what is you do to give your image that final magic touch?

There is no magic, unfortunately. Only a good model, realistic materials, natural looking light, proper scene composition, quality rendering, and subtle but skilled post production will make a good image. If it’s just one part that lacks finesse, the result will not look right. Easy as that.

15138459_1306324052745441_2753173313148843052_o

11. Thanks a lot for doing this for us, if people wanted to contact you where can they find you?

It was a pleasure. Thank you render Guy.

My website is http://guachinarte.com
or you can find me on facebook https://www.facebook.com/guachinarte

To learn more about Vrayforc4d get our Masterclass online and start learning now!

masterclass

 

]]>
http://3dtools.info/phil-buerer/feed/ 0
Oskar Füleki Germany http://3dtools.info/oskar_fuleki_germany/ http://3dtools.info/oskar_fuleki_germany/#comments Mon, 30 Jan 2017 10:14:44 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=7116 This week The Render Guy meets Oskar Füleki from Germany a fantastic artist which work has been widely published. He is an avid VRAYforC4D user.

I personally met Oskar in Vienna at one of the d2 Conference in Vienna workshops and I had the chance to talk to to him in person.

I hope you enjoy this interview  as much as I did.

 

1. Hi Oskar, thanks for taking the time; tell us please who you are and what you do.

Hi, my name is Oskar Füleki. I am 27 years old and was born in Romania but live in Germany since 21 years.
I am an architectural draftsman who is doing 3D renderings in his spare time as a freelancer (www.visumetrie.de). I do this for commercial purpose and also for non-commercial projects. And I love it…

1-nava-visumetrie-1

2. how did you get in the field of Archviz?

During my apprenticeship to an architectural draftsman I was fascinated immediately by 3D renderings from well known architects. In the same time I was wondering if and how I could do this by myself. Done some researches I got myself a copy of Cinema 4D :)

4-nava-visumetrie-2

3.Can you tell us a bit more about your work, how do you approach it, what do you try to achieve, what do you like about it and when do your consider a project ready?

When I work for a customer I try to combine a desired feeling with functional explanations in one image. I like the process of creating persuading images out of random scratches or floor plans.

Concerning non-commercial projects I sometimes get my inspiration just from everyday situations, buildings or interesting lighting conditions… or simply from Pinterest. I try to achieve perfection in every detail. Consider it ready is one of the hardest parts. I am fully finished when I don’t want to change anything in the post production a few days in a row.

7-nava-visumetrie-4

4. Who is your biggest influence when it comes to finding inspiration?

Just 3 names:
Grant Warwick, Marek Denko, Cornelius Dämmrich

8-black-box-visumetrie-5

5. You are obviously a VRAYforC4D user, what pushed you towards this software?

From the very beginning I wanted to understand how this software works – get the full controll over it and do precise settings. Just over time I understood what is really possible with V-Ray and I wanted to learn more and more…

2-industrial-restaurant-visumetrie-1

6. Do you already work with Version 3.4?

Not yet, I was busy with the creation of “Navá” and did not have the time. But I am looking forward to try it. Especially because I have seen many cool new features already.

3-bedroom-visumetrie

7. Can you tell us one of the funniest things that happened during your career as a 3d artist?

Instead of inviting my new girlfriend to get a coffee I seduced her by showing her a picture of my project “Black Box” :)

6-black-box-visumetrie-1

8. How do you think the industry will change in the near future?

I think VR will of course become more and more relevant. And I expect that the audience will be fed up with photorealistic renderings soon. Artistic stuff will be more requested.

10-black-box-visumetrie-3

9. If you were to mentor someone about this career, what would you suggest or recommend? Or if you could back in time to 10 years ago, what would you say to your younger self?

10 years ago I was 17… and thought about ahhhhhhh something else.

But now I would suggest to try different software in order to find your own preferences and the most suitable for your personal needs. V-Ray would be a good choice :)

5-modernes-wohnhaus-visumetrie-2

10.Now on the geek side, what is you do to give your image that final magic touch?

Well, when the base image is crap it doesn’t matter how good your post production skills are. There needs to be a minimum in the composition of the image. And personally I try to get as many things done in 3D as possible. In the end I use Photoshop for the final touch. Sometimes I get inspired by the Color Grading of other artists or movies.

9-modernes-wohnhaus-visumetrie-6

11. Thanks a lot for doing this for us, if people wanted to contact you where can they find you?

Thanks a lot for the opportunity. It was a huge pleasure answering your questions. Keep on doing such a good work.

People can contact me on my website, Facebook, or Behance:

www.visumetrie.de
www.facebook.com/visumetrie
www.behance.net/visumetrie

To learn more about Vrayforc4d get our Masterclass online and start learning now!

masterclass

 

]]>
http://3dtools.info/oskar_fuleki_germany/feed/ 0
Bruger Studio Italy http://3dtools.info/bruger-studio-italy/ http://3dtools.info/bruger-studio-italy/#comments Mon, 14 Nov 2016 16:03:23 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=6773 This week The Render Guy meets Bruger Studio from Italy a creative studio which work has been widely published. They are VRAYforC4D user.

Bruger Studio are long time friends of the d2 Conference in Vienna and I had the chance to talk to them in person many times.

I hope you enjoy this interview  as much as I did.



sofa

1. Hi guys, thanks for taking the time; tell us please who you are and what you do.

Hi! I am Marco Brunato and together with Davide Gerlin we run Bruger, a creative studio for design and architecture based in Castelfranco Veneto, Italy.
Beside architectural projects and interior and product design we work a lot with visualization, making renders for furniture and kitchen companies.

White_Glass_Spessart_Oak_GEN

2. How did you get in the field of Archviz/Visualization?

We have different backgrounds, i am a designer and always worked with 3d modeling and rendering while Davide is an architect. We met in a studio where we worked together making mainly visualization and after a couple of years we decided to start our own company. We luckily live in an area (north east of Italy) which is full of furniture companies and making catalogs totally with renders became an increasing trend in the last years, as companies could cut out expensive photo-shoot costs. So getting into archiviz was an easy choice since there were a lot of requests.

k01

3.Can you tell us a bit more about your work, how do you approach it, what do you try to achieve, what do you like about it and when do your consider a project ready?

As i mention before our images are made for product catalogs so we have a totally different approach to visualization and we always try to achieve the best photo-realism.
The approach is much more close to a standard photographic shoot than classic archiviz as it became popular these last years.
There is a part of “styling” in our work which involves designing the interiors and choosing all the objects that will populate and decorate your scene (sometimes called “digital art-buyer”) and the classic part of 3d modeling and rendering. Material setup is also challenging because they have to match exactly the real ones, and clients focuses heavily on this aspect.
We send lower resolution preview images to clients throughout the process and when HE/SHE  decides everything is ok, we go for the high resolution images. As you can imagine a catalog features a lot of images so post production process should be as small as possible, it is unthinkable to have a 2 hours of post production for an image if the whole work features 60 images or more.
We are anyway trying to focus a lot over the styling and emotional part of the job because that can give you an identity as a studio, though not leaving out the technical aspects that rendering involves, but photo-realism and rendering in general is getting easier everyday so you have to distinct yourself and compete on different aspects in order to succeed.

dec_s_2
3. Who is your biggest influence when it comes to finding inspiration?

Well this is hard to say! I think inspiration comes unconsciously from every thing that surrounds you. Let say that in our job we look a lot at big furniture companies that still make photo-shoots for their advertising campaign like Minotti, Poliform, Molteni as well as at interior magazines and online blogs.
Pinterest is also good to find very interesting images, we sometimes setup “mood boards” with different images we found around to define the style a project will have.

DEC_CLASS_VERT_alta

4. You guys are obviously VRAYforC4D users, what pushed you towards this software?

Speed. Absolutely. When we started working in another studio they were using Maxwell render and render times were dramatic, very frustrating.
In V-Ray you can save your own different render settings, so now in our workflow we can switch from a super fast preview render setting to a production one
in just one click. We can make 5k or 6k images in a few hours using just one workstation, and this is perfect for our workflow.
There is a big hype nowadays about GPU renders but they won’t fit our workflow, we have too many polygons and high resolution texture that GPU couldn’t handle.
Also Cinema 4D  is a software we were already using and we don’t have much modeling tasks in our workflow (in which cinema lacks a bit), it is more focused on scene management and organization and for this cinema’s scene manager is great.

BAGNO_MICROTOP

BAGNO_01

5. Can you tell us one of the funniest things that happened during your career as a 3d artist?

Sometimes a client can ask you for a render but they don’t have any idea of what they are talking about, so it happened that once an art director asked us if we could give her our renders in Illustrator paths so she could move the furniture around the scene. That was awesome.

01

6. How do you think the industry will change in the near future?

Everybody is looking at VR and probably there will be more requests in the future, but not in the short-term in my opinion. I am much more interested in the growing 3d scans trend, it will lead to greater realism with almost no modeling or shading time and this, for a lazy ass like me, sounds great! I hope for a future where visualizers will concentrate only on the artistic part of the job discarding the tedious technical approach.

TERRAZZO

7. If you were to mentor someone about this career, what would you suggest or recommend? Or if you could go back in time to 10 years ago, what would you say to your younger self?

The only advice i can give is: learn photography. I don’t mean taking pictures, like everybody do nowadays with those damn phones, i mean real photography: exposure, time, stops, lenses, framing and composition. It will help you a lot if you are serious about this job.

AL01_GEN_alta

8.Now on the geek side, what is you do to give your image that final magic touch?

I studied a lot of photography post production techniques and tutorials, one trick that i often use in my images is using Photoshop dodge and burn tools on a 50% grey level in Overlay mode above the image, it allows to add nice light and shadows details and depth to images. Recently we have been experimenting a lot also with LUTs, which are great for realistic photographic look.

_vert_PROMO_ALTA

 

9. Thanks a lot for doing this for us, if people wanted to contact you where can they find you?

Thank You Render Guy for giving us this opportunity! We have our website www.brugerstudio.com as well as most of the social networks: facebook, twitter, instagram and linkedin Just look us up @BrugerStudio.AL_02_GEN_ALTA

To learn more about Vrayforc4d get our Masterclass online and start learning now!

masterclass

 

]]>
http://3dtools.info/bruger-studio-italy/feed/ 0
Jost Hauer Germany http://3dtools.info/jost-hauer-germany/ http://3dtools.info/jost-hauer-germany/#comments Mon, 07 Nov 2016 10:52:48 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=6742 This week The Render Guy meets Jost Hauer of loomn in Germany an Arch-viz artist I have been following for a while now since he also is a VRAYforC4D user.

I have met Jost in Vienna many times during the d2 Conference and he also uses  Cinema 4d and Vray, let’s see what he has to say.

I hope you enjoy this interview  as much as I did.

 

1. Hi Jost, thanks for taking the time; tell us please who you are and what you do.

Hi Render Guy, thank you very much for the opportunity to share my thoughts. My name is Jost and I am running a studio called loomn based in Gütersloh, Germany. Like many others I studied architecture in college and realized pretty soon that I was interested in portraying and communicating concepts rather than in establishing a building in reality. I have always been passionate about architecture, technology, CG, VFX, concept art and photography. I consider myself pretty lucky that I found a way to combine all these interests.

150325-loomn-3d-visualisierung

2. How did you get in the field of Archviz?

Since playing with legos as a little boy I have known that architecture is the field for me. It was it fascinating to draw something out of the blue that might become reality in the end. The first time I encountered perspective drawing in art classes at school, got me addicted. Eventually I realized that you could construct complete universes in computer games instead of just playing these games, it opened up a whole new world to me. Well, this was in the 90’s and the games looked rather lousy compared to those of today, but they allowed for creating space that you could experience and this was very rewarding to me. So I enrolled at university and got my degree in architecture. I luckily ended up as a project manager for an archviz company in Zürich. That was the moment when I realized this is the way I want to set out on.

150811-loomn-3d-visualisierung

3.Can you tell us a bit more about your work, how do you approach it, what do you try to achieve, what do you like about it and when do your consider a project ready?

At loomn we mostly do images for competitions. As we are all architects here, we are always very curious about new designs, new ideas and a wide range of different tasks. The setting is quite beneficial for us. The challenge to distill the very essence of a project into just one image drives us forward. There is so much more to a project than just the CAD drawings. You have to consider the purpose of a project, the location, your client‘s perception and focus, the audience that is addressed to.
Our main goal is to provide our client with an image that exactly reflects the intention of the design, he/she may be aware of it or not. Sometimes we have to read between the lines to get a sense of what is necessary. After a first rough composition in wireframe our clients give us total freedom to show the building in the best possible light and mood. But we also get a lot of useful criticism on our images and we try to take that into account as we work on the next draft. These images are always teamwork between our clients and us.
Each of us at loomn has a unique way of looking at an image; there is no right or wrong. And it is great if your own vision of a building is overlapping with your client’s imagination or even goes beyond it.
The project is done when our client needs to print it. This inevitable deadline is what I really like about competitions. You are forced to structure, plan ahead and think about necessities. However we do have an economic responsibility for our client and for ourselves. The effort you put in and the output you generate have to be in the right proportion. Otherwise you are tweaking a project beyond its purpose.

160218-loomn-3d-visualisierung

4. who is your biggest influence when it comes to finding inspiration?

Reality! Well, you can learn a lot from other artists. You can study their work and use it to refresh your own eyes. But in the end it all comes down to your own experience. Go outside, study the real world, try to get a sense of a situation, take photos and make drawings.
It is all there, right before your doorstep, you just have to open your eyes.

5. You are obviously a VRAYforC4D user, what pushed you towards this software?

Cinema was the first 3d software I ever installed, about 20 years ago. Until now it never let me down. And it is just fun to work with V-Ray. It gives you great freedom to achieve what you have in mind as an artist.
Ultimately, these are only tools and as artists we have to remind ourselves that it all comes down to our own imagination; no matter whether you use high-end rendering engines or draw by hand. If someone is good at photography or drawing, he will find a way to realize his vision in any software. If someone applies for a job at loomn, I do not ask them how they did their images, I rather ask the why.

140123-loomn-3d-visualisierung

6. Can you tell us one of the funniest things that happened during your career as a 3d artist?

We have a lot of fun at the office. Actually I do not think we could do a good job without any fun at all. An image will never be good if you have to do it under too much pressure or without being relaxed when doing it. I can’t point out a single situation to you, but a day without laughter actually is a wasted day!

140724-loomn-3d-visualisierung

7. How do you think the industry will change in the near future?

That’s a tough one. But actually I do not think it will change that much. Our tools will change that’s for sure. I see ourselves as photographers in a virtual reality. There will always be some kind of camera and and some kind of subject, no matter whether you work on paper or on a holodesk.

140824-loomn-3d-visualisierung

8. If you were to mentor someone about this career, what would you suggest or recommend? Or if you could go back in time to 10 years ago, what would you say to your younger self?

I do not want to mess with the space-time continuum (LOL), I have watched too many episodes on TV where this went terribly wrong.
Also it is hard to give any advice because everything I could possibly say is based on my own personal experience. And that’s what it all boils down to: Just trust your personal experience. If you love what you are doing, you are doing it right.

141006-loomn-3d-visualisierung

9.Now on the geek side, what is you do to give your image that final magic touch?

If I wasn’t afraid to be sued by Eric and Trond, I would say lens flares, blur and fog. But even more important from my point of view is the initial touch, I would say. If you have a good composition, it is very hard to mess it up big time.

141210-loomn-3d-visualisierung

10. Thanks a lot for doing this Jost! If people wanted to contact you where can they find you?

Thank you Render Guy, you can for sure find us on our website: www.loomn.de and on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/loomn.visualisierung/

141211-loomn-3d-visualisierung

To learn more about Vrayforc4d get our Masterclass online and start learning now!

masterclass

]]> http://3dtools.info/jost-hauer-germany/feed/ 0 Diffusion 4 http://3dtools.info/diffusion-4/ http://3dtools.info/diffusion-4/#comments Tue, 04 Oct 2016 11:50:37 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=6595

We’re proud to present the new age in CG materials – Diffusion 4.

D4-R18-V33-3CU_mini

Stunning 4k materials just in time

Diffusion is a collection of high-quality, seamless textures for VRayforC4D. These image-based materials will elevate every render, no matter the project. A staggering 6K resolution (6144 x 6144px) for every material as well as a wide range of architectural surfaces, this collection is a must have for any studio.

d2_web

Built for your workflow

Everything has been designed with the user in mind. From the custom installation packages to the crafted views in your Content Browser, your experience with diffusion will be seamless and you’ll be able to integrate it into any workflow easily.

d1_web

Made for D.R.

We know how precious your time is and that’s why every one of the 40 shaders have been crafted for use with Distributed Rendering in Vray for Cinema 4D. Allowing you to focus more on being creative and less on watching buckets fill up.

model_raw_steirereck_Stefan_08only_mograph

Requirements

DIFFUSION will run on both MAC and PC. You can install it on Cinema 4D R12 and up. A minimum requirement of VRayforC4D 1.8 is required and Hair shaders will require the Studio version of Cinema 4D. Textures compatible with any 3D software and render engine.

Some more examples of DIFFUSION can be seen below

You can download all 40 materials for 55,00 € and start making incredible renders in minutes.

Diffusion4_Product-200x200
full_gallery
]]>
http://3dtools.info/diffusion-4/feed/ 0
Diffusion 3 Shaders http://3dtools.info/diffusion-3-shaders/ http://3dtools.info/diffusion-3-shaders/#comments Thu, 09 Jun 2016 10:25:22 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=6174

40 Premium VRayforC4D materials

6_pack

Stunning 4k materials just in time

Diffusion is a collection of high-quality, seamless textures for VRayforC4D. The highest attention to detail has been taken into account and these seamless, 4k (4096 X 4096px) shaders are sure to bring all your renders to life.

Oak0002

Built for your workflow

Everything has been designed with the user in mind. From the custom installation packages to the crafted views in your Content Browser, your experience with diffusion will be seamless and you’ll be able to integrate it into any workflow easily.

vudumotion_12

Made for D.R.

We know how precious your time is and that’s why every one of the 40 shaders have been crafted for use with Distributed Rendering in Vray for Cinema 4D. Allowing you to focus more on being creative and less on watching buckets fill up.

shot01-cam02

What’s in the pack?

We’ve designed 160 premium shaders covering a wide variety of categories, including: Architecture, Fabric, Food, Metal, Stone and Wood to name a few. Be sure to check out the full gallery and get a closer look at these shaders.

DIFF_002_Production_ready

Requirements

DIFFUSION will run on both MAC and PC. You can install it on Cinema 4D R12 and up. A minimum requirement of VRayforC4D 1.8 is required and Hair shaders will require the Studio version of Cinema 4D.

Wall_0002-1024x405

Some more examples of DIFFUSION can be seen below

1
]]>
http://3dtools.info/diffusion-3-shaders/feed/ 0
Nuno Silva Portugal http://3dtools.info/nuno-silva-portugal/ http://3dtools.info/nuno-silva-portugal/#comments Tue, 10 May 2016 11:36:01 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=6091 This week The Render Guy meets Nuno Silva of nu.ma in Portugalan Arch-viz artist I have been following for a while now since he also is a VRAYforC4D user.

Being myself also a Cinema 4d and Vray user I was very interested in having a small conversation with him that I could share with you guys.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

1. The Render Guy: Hi Nuno, thanks for taking the time; tell us please who you are and what you do.

Nuno Silva: Hi render guy, first of all let me thank you for this opportunity. About me, i’m a Portuguese architect and a 3D artist. I’m the CEO of nu.ma since 2010. nu.ma is a small office that is committed to deliver high quality 3D visualization images.

We target architects, designers, real-estate investors, the furniture industry and so on. Our experience in architecture and in the construction field, gave us a full understanding of the relationship between Architecture, Design and the 3D digital production.

01

2. TRG: how did you get in the field of Archviz?

NS: Very early, as an architect, I saw the huge advantage of using this powerful technique to convince clients and selling them architectural projects. With the advantage of being an architect, I decided to conjugate my skills with 3D art, and become better in the modeling and rendering of 3D images. By putting together these two arts (architecture and 3D) it’s our capital gain, because we know and understand what architects like and want, and we can help them to sell their projects, in a better way.

I01 (2)

3.TRG: Can you tell us a bit more about your work, how do you approach it, what do you try to achieve,what do you like about it and when do your consider a project ready?

NS: Well, the projects always start with a conversation with the client, so to understand what the main goal of the images is, what are these images going to be used for, which elements will be provided to us by the designer and which elements will need to be worked and designed by us instead. After that, we start with the research of some influences and inspirations, and only then we start going through the project. Every project has a different approach, meaning they don’t follow always the same line, however we try to develop a specific working method for each work. Also We always keep in mind that it is worth to loose some time thinking about the project before starting, than taking a lot more time doing and re-doing modifications to the same project many many times. The Italian Architect Achille Castiglioni used to say “I spend one year laying on the couch thinking… then and only then I pick up in my pencil…” .

I03-VF

In a general way, the work starts always with some sketches trying to imagine our final 3D image. With those sketches we try to show our clients the potentials of the project from our point of
view. It is obvious that the client always has some influence as well, after all they know clearly how the project should look like (at least in their mind) ;). After we agree on the general idea, we star the modeling of the project according to the provided elements (CAD existing 3d models and so on). The composition and balance on the image is performed already at this stage. The composition is very important when we look at a picture. If it doesn’t show an harmonious balance, it wont captures our attention. When the model is ready, the next step is the lighting tests. These tests are always performed in a neutral white base to clearly understand which and what kind of light we need. These tests are always performed though an hierarchy method: main light; secondary light; backup light. The principles of this method were acquired through the 5SRW course (which is a very good course and it is also available for c4d users).
After the light is set we will start applying materials. If the materials are not well constructed this could destroy the image. Finding out and understanding materials imperfections at this stage is very important. We work hard to make the materials we use, as real as possible. In the real world nothing is perfect, and for that reason, some imperfections must be added to the materials, to achieve realism. VRAYforC4D has some tools that are very useful and can be an important help you in this step. Then we finally get to the image optimisation and post-production, which I confess, is the part that I like less because of how unflexible it is when it comes to changes. That’s why I try to implement as much as possible in 3D, in order to minimize the post-production work.

IMG02

4.TRG: Who is your biggest influence when it comes to finding inspiration?

NS: I have some strong inspiration sources for what concerns 3D. My biggest influences and inspirations come from photography. It is funny, that in photography, photographs try to “clean” the imperfections of the image whilst in 3D, we the 3D artists, try to introduce several imperfections into the image. One of the photographers that inspire me is Ferreira Alves, from Portugal. He was able to capture architecture in its true essence and pure beauty. The details in his work are very important. I also like the Fernando Guerra’s work (another Portuguese photographer). He turns the architecture into a spectacule. Not in the way he captures it, but in the why he transforms it. It is the artistic look that he gives to the buildings that is interesting to me.
These are two reference points that I try to get in my 3D.

I02-i

5. TRG: You are obviously a VRAYforC4D user, what pushed you towards this software?

NS: The bases of my modeling work (for architecture and 3D) is done in ArchiCad. At the beginning I worked with 3DMax, but the conversion from archicad, made the process too difficult. That’s way I started using Cinema 4D. At the time there was no VRAYforC4D. When I discover that Laublab was working on a version of VRAY for Cinema 4D, I got very excited, I was one of the pioneers buying the very first version of the software. The render engine is very powerful and flexible, and can adapt to all the different situations. It is important that this render engine continues to evolve, because as the users increases so do their needs.

I02

6.TRG: Can you tell us one of the funniest things that happened during your career as a 3d artist?

NS: Hum… there are not too many funny things, at least when they happen, ;) but it is very common that the clients think that we are working with something like a photographic camera, and that all we do is pressing a button and just like this the image appears. Sometimes it happens that after the final image is prepared (with post-production and everything), the client says “please move the sofa just a little bit to the right”… and I think… really?

I02 (2)

7.TRG: How do you think the industry will change in the near future?

NS: the 3D industry is moving very very quickly. Many things are happening. The render engines are increasingly more effective, faster and they allow a quicker feedback speeding up the whole workflow. However there are some things that will never change. For example the way that the images are created. This process cannot be fully automated. We will always need a person behind the computer making renders. Render engines as tools, can be compared to numbers that are processed. However the artist that might operate those machines will do in a different way from another artist, for that reason, the final images always will have a different human touch.

I01_Vf (2)

8. TRG: If you were to mentor someone about this career, what would you suggest or recommend? Or if you could go back in time to 10 years ago, what would you say to your younger self?

NS: I don’t like to impose any philosophy on each one’s career, because each one should follow his/her own taste and make things that make them feel good. I do think that one should always give their best, and not feel sorry about what you should have done or would have done at the end of a project. No regrets, try hard, improve your skills, be a step forward of everyone else, and respect your client.

MG_STROM02-V-i01

9. TRG: Now on the geek side, what is it you do to give your image that final magic touch?

For me, the “final magic touch” is when I press the send button and the client response is “fantastic, we are very pleased with the final work”! I don’t think that there is a “final magic touch”. Sometimes we are few seconds away from sending the final images, and we go back to fix a bit the contrast, or take some saturation away… it is very relative.

I05

10. TRG: Thanks a lot for doing this for us, if people wanted to contact you where can they find you?

Oh please, thank you for the opportunity. For all of those who wish to get in touch you can find us here www.numa.pt and obviously on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nu.ma.arq

To learn more about Vrayforc4d get our Masterclass online and start learning now!

masterclass

]]>
http://3dtools.info/nuno-silva-portugal/feed/ 0
Visualforensic – Paris http://3dtools.info/visualforensic-paris/ http://3dtools.info/visualforensic-paris/#comments Thu, 24 Mar 2016 09:41:35 +0000 http://3dtools.info/?p=5932 This week the render guy meets Paris based artist Philippe Froesch.

facedetail1

The Render guy: Dear Philippe, Thank you so much for finding the time to answer my questions, let us get straight into it. Please tell us a bit more about yourself.

Philippe Froesch: Hi I am Philippe, I am 50 years old, French, digital sculptor specialized in facial reconstructions, director of Visualforensic which is a company I created 7 years ago when I was living in Barcelona. I am working in Paris now, collaborating with a forensic research team from the University Versailles UFR.

Henri4
TRG: I have come across your work and it is fantastic, absolutely stunning! Still I struggle understanding what you do precisely, can you tell us a bit more about your job, what do you do in the specific?

PF: My job consist in giving back faces to skulls, something formally known as Forensic Facial Approximation/Reconstruction. Scientist teams  give me skulls data and I use forensic techniques combined with art techniques to recreate the most probable face of dead people. I work almost only for museums or tv producers.

headGEO1


 

HAIRdetail

TRG: What is it that pushed you to take your current path? What was your formal training?

PF: Life pushed me, I have a bachelor degrees in Art and I’m in the 3D world since the end of the 80’s, and after a tremendous burn out where I decided “never again to do 3D” ( xD) I met with a friend that i didn’t see since years and she told me “why don’t we try something with a skull I have?” . She was and still is an anthropologist from Barcelona’s Autonomous University. That’s how it all begun over 10 years ago. Between those two moments I was teaching character design in a school from the suburbs of Barcelona.

woman


 

facemale

TRG: What is the most interesting part of your job?

PF: The scientific part is like an investigation, you need to calculate the nose shape with equations and look for details on the skull to understand the muscles location, or look at the bite/teeth to understand how the lips would have looked, etc. This part requires one to be meticulous. The artistic part has to do with the non-objective elements like the expression, hair shape, lightning, focus etc. I find this combination of art and science really cool.

maleBeardMuscles

TRG: Obviously you are a VRAYforC4D user, why did you make that choice?

PF: years ago I was looking for a render that could produce realistic SSS/skin and that could fit in C4D. VrayforC4D choice was logical. I love the quality of the skin rendering, and it is for me quite instinctive now. in the beginning I had good headaches to understand how I could simulate what I was looking for. Now years later all seems so easy with VRAYforC4D. It’s my best decision to date. Another important element is that it can render the hairs from Cinema4D, and when you begin to understand the Hair module you can do very interesting things.

HairC4D_2


 

HairC4D

TRG: Which other tools do you use in your daily pipeline and how?

PF: Osirix, which is a Dicom viewer, for importing the tomography/scanners data bases, and Zbrush for sculpting/texturing.

zb1

TRG: I am sure many will find this article very inspiring, any suggestions you can give to those who are thinking to take the same road as you?

PF: Simple things: study art, anatomy, photography,anthropology, forensic techniques, meet scientists, work (even for free) on simple cases to have the opportunity to create a book of your 3D works, and look at faces, every day (don’t be creepy about it though), try to understand how to draw them, sculpt them. Faces must become almost an obsession, and after that, you will realize that faces are very complicated things to simulate in 3D. Complicated in stills. And if you talk about animated faces the difficulty grows exponentially, because very small details will make your creation look natural or totally weird.

FacesBW

TRG: Looking at yourself as an artist, if you could go back in time, is there something that you would change or do better to improve yourself?

PF: Do more anatomy studies…. I hated that in school, I didn’t want to draw heads or faces. Then what do you know…life has a weird sense of humor.

SkinVrayforC4D

TRG: Thank you for taking the time to talk to me, Where can people find you to see more of your work?

PF: Thank you for giving me this chance render guy ;) You can find me on the web at www.visualforensic.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/VISUALFORENSIC


 

You can get your VRAYforC4D licence here

Additionally you can learn all the secrets of VRAYforC4D studying our Masterclass.

masterclass

]]> http://3dtools.info/visualforensic-paris/feed/ 0